Category Archives: Health

Preventing Injury in Overhead Athletes: Part 4

Pre-habilitation Exercises for Overhead Athletes

As a kettlebell coach whose number one goal is to keep her athletes healthy, I’m always looking to learn from other health and fitness experts that have ideas on the subject of injury prevention. Unfortunately, overuse injuries run rampant when people don’t properly prepare their bodies for the volume-heavy work in Kettlebell Sport, from a mobility and/or stability standpoint.

This is the fourth (and last!) in a series of posts where Doctor of Physical Therapy (and Team KOR kettlebell lifter!) Jordan Levine will share his favorite pre-habilitation exercises to build shoulder stability and avoid injury with overhead lifting. Whether you’re a coach or an athlete that uses kettlebells, these are great exercises you can implement to prevent overuse injuries before they happen.


Bottoms Up Screwdriver

  • Start lying on your back. With kettlebell in bottoms up position and thumb side of hand pointing up. Keep bottom of kettlebell pointing straight upward.
  • Begin by setting scapula gently down and back and keep in this position for entirety of exercise.
  • Use screw motion to internally rotate shoulder by rotating thumb inward, then externally rotate shoulder by rotating thumb outward.
  • Repeat for high reps (20 or more) until burn is felt or form begins to compromise. Start with light weight and make sure to rotate from whole arm (not solely forearm/wrist).
  • For an increased challenge, perform exercise lying on your side.
  • This exercise is a great for building stability of the ball and socket joint of the shoulder as well as strengthening rotator cuff muscles and scapula stabilizer muscles. Research has shown creating distal instability down the chain of the extremity (i.e. using a bottoms up kettlebell) leads to increased muscle activation.

Dr. Jordan Levine PT, DPT is a physical therapist at North County Water and Sports Therapy Center located in the Carmel Mountain Ranch area of San Diego. He specializes in orthopedics with a strong emphasis on manual therapy.

Click here to check out part 1 of the Preventing Injury in Overhead Athletes series.

Click here to check out part 2 of the Preventing Injury in Overhead Athletes series.

Click here to check out part 3 of the Preventing Injury in Overhead Athletes series.

Sharing is caring! Email this to someonePin on PinterestTweet about this on TwitterShare on Facebook

Preventing Injury in Overhead Athletes: Part 3

Pre-habilitation Exercises for Overhead Athletes

As a kettlebell coach whose number one goal is to keep her athletes healthy, I’m always looking to learn from other health and fitness experts that have ideas on the subject of injury prevention. Unfortunately, overuse injuries run rampant when people don’t properly prepare their bodies for the volume-heavy work in Kettlebell Sport, from a mobility and/or stability standpoint.

This is the third in a series of posts where Doctor of Physical Therapy (and Team KOR kettlebell lifter!) Jordan Levine will share his favorite pre-habilitation exercises to build shoulder stability and avoid injury with overhead lifting. Whether you’re a coach or an athlete that uses kettlebells, these are great exercises you can implement to prevent overuse injuries before they happen.


Serratus Anterior Wall Roll

  • Place foam roller horizontally against wall; slightly lower than shoulder height.
  • Weight bear wrists to mid forearms area against foam roller with body rigid and angled away from wall.
  • First engage abdominals; think about keeping ribcage down. Then protract scapulas (push blades apart), pushing elbows further into wall without straightening elbows.
  • Imagine you are pushing foam roller through the wall with elbows and then slowly roll upward while keeping that push through the wall. Stop when elbows reach about eye level or foam roller reaches elbows.
  • Keep that elbow push through the wall and roll foam roller back to start position with roller at wrist to mid forearm.
  • Repeat for high reps (20 or more) at slow pace.
  • You should feel the muscles in your armpit / rib area working as you push elbows upward.
  • The serratus anterior is a main contributor to outward scapula rotation along with upper and lower trap muscles. Outward rotation of the scapula must occur during overhead lifting to get full range of motion and to stabilize scapula so smaller muscles of shoulder do not get overworked (which can lead to injury over time).

Dr. Jordan Levine PT, DPT is a physical therapist at North County Water and Sports Therapy Center located in the Carmel Mountain Ranch area of San Diego. He specializes in orthopedics with a strong emphasis on manual therapy.

Click here to check out part 1 of the Preventing Injury in Overhead Athletes series.

Click here to check out part 2 of the Preventing Injury in Overhead Athletes series.

Sharing is caring! Email this to someonePin on PinterestTweet about this on TwitterShare on Facebook

Preventing Injury in Overhead Athletes: Part 2

Pre-habilitation Exercises for Overhead Athletes

As a kettlebell coach whose number one goal is to keep her athletes healthy, I’m always looking to learn from other health and fitness experts that have ideas on the subject of injury prevention. Unfortunately, overuse injuries run rampant when people don’t properly prepare their bodies for the volume-heavy work in Kettlebell Sport, from a mobility and/or stability standpoint.

This is the second in a series of posts where Doctor of Physical Therapy (and Team KOR kettlebell lifter!) Jordan Levine will share his favorite pre-habilitation exercises to build shoulder stability and avoid injury with overhead lifting. Whether you’re a coach or an athlete that uses kettlebells, these are great exercises you can implement to prevent overuse injuries before they happen.


Isometric Shoulder External Rotation with Mini Band

  • Place mini band loop around both wrists.
  • Flex elbows to 90 degrees and place against rib cage. Gently set scapulas down and back, then rotate hands away from one another to externally rotate both shoulders.
  • Keep equal tension on band while slowly elevating arms. Flex at shoulder until elbows are at shoulder height.
  • Keep tension on band while lowering elbows back to starting position.
  • Repeat for high reps (20 or more) at slow pace with light resistance.
  • This is a great rotator cuff exercise for building endurance and strength at end range external rotation, both of which are beneficial for repeated overhead lifting.
  • The mini band used in the above video can be found here, or you can hold resistance tubing in hands to replace the mini band.

Dr. Jordan Levine PT, DPT is a physical therapist at North County Water and Sports Therapy Center located in the Carmel Mountain Ranch area of San Diego. He specializes in orthopedics with a strong emphasis on manual therapy.

Click here to check out part 1 of the Preventing Injury in Overhead Athletes series.

Sharing is caring! Email this to someonePin on PinterestTweet about this on TwitterShare on Facebook

Preventing Injury in Overhead Athletes: Part 1

Pre-habilitation Exercises for Overhead Athletes

As a kettlebell coach whose number one goal is to keep her athletes healthy, I’m always looking to learn from other health and fitness experts that have ideas on the subject of injury prevention. Unfortunately, overuse injuries run rampant when people don’t properly prepare their bodies for the volume-heavy work in Kettlebell Sport, from a mobility and/or stability standpoint.

This is the first in a series of posts where Doctor of Physical Therapy (and Team KOR kettlebell lifter!) Jordan Levine will share his favorite pre-habilitation exercises to build shoulder stability and avoid injury with overhead lifting. Whether you’re a coach or an athlete that uses kettlebells, these are great exercises you can implement to prevent overuse injuries before they happen.


Y – T – W – L Scapular Retractions

  • Begin in one of two positions: 1) Lying prone on Swiss ball, or 2) Stand bent forward hinged at hips with neutral spine.
  • Keep abdominal muscles engaged and squeeze scapula down and together while simultaneously bringing arms up to spell Y, T, W, and L.
  • Perform with light or no weight and high reps, with a slow tempo to build stability. 2 sets of 10 reps of Y, T, W, and L is a good place is start.
  • Point thumbs toward the ceiling and do not allow scapula to elevate toward ears throughout the movement.
  • This exercise is intended to increase scapular stability and scapulohumeral rhythm by strengthening the middle and lower trapezius muscles. These muscles often get overpowered by dominant upper trapezius or rhomboids. To help bias the lower/middle trap muscles make sure to externally rotate the humerus by pointing the thumbs towards the ceiling and do not allow scapulas to elevate towards ears.

Dr. Jordan Levine PT, DPT is a physical therapist at North County Water and Sports Therapy Center located in the Carmel Mountain Ranch area of San Diego. He specializes in orthopedics with a strong emphasis on manual therapy.

Sharing is caring! Email this to someonePin on PinterestTweet about this on TwitterShare on Facebook
fafbb519-6f8a-4390-94a6-19cd05bbbced

Hand Care for Kettlebell Lifters

As we all know, kettlebell lifting can wreak havoc on your hands. I, for one, often feel self-conscious giving people a high five because of the blood blisters, callouses, or giant patches of dry skin on my hands. In some gym cultures, ripping your hand is a glorified battle wound that shows you gave your all in a workout. In the kettlebell world, ripping your hand totally sucks because it means your technique was off and/or you might not be able to train tomorrow.

Even if you don’t particularly care what your hands look like, there are several factors to keep in mind if you want to lift consistently without tearing up your hands.

How Do You Prevent a Hand Tear?

Continue reading

Sharing is caring! Email this to someonePin on PinterestTweet about this on TwitterShare on Facebook
12399169_10101637986998015_1842432953_n

Famous actress becomes Kettlebell Sport enthusiast

12399038_10101637986828355_1165511706_n

How do I spell your name correctly?
Helén Vikstvedt.

What do you do for a living?
I’m an actress. I perform at the national theater in Oslo for the time being, and I’m in a Norwegian film that is playing now. I do improv and teach improv as well.

What is your work schedule like?
I rehearse and perform 4-6 times per week, often with two shows on the weekend. I do other work in the daytime, such as recording commercials for the radio or filming for a TV series. Occasionally I work with a touring country and tour Norway. If I do films like I did last year, I travel to Hungary and Germany to shoot. Now I mostly work in Oslo because I have a young daughter.  Continue reading

Sharing is caring! Email this to someonePin on PinterestTweet about this on TwitterShare on Facebook
emily2

Return to KB Sport Series #2: Emily Doenlen

My first competition was after just a few months of training in November of 2013. I competed with the 12kg and got 103 reps. In December I competed again with the same weight and got around 130 reps. After that, I figured I was ready to move up in bell weight and started transitioning up to the 16kg. I decided that the Cali Open in February 2014 would be my next goal.

Ten seconds before the completion of my 10-minute set of One Arm Long Cycle with the 16kg bell, I broke my arm. Continue reading

Sharing is caring! Email this to someonePin on PinterestTweet about this on TwitterShare on Facebook

3 Kettlebell Mobility Drills

1. Weighted shoulder dislocations (upper lefthand corner of video): Start with no weight and progress in 1-2lb increments.

2. Jefferson curl (upper righthand corner of video): Start by dropping your head and neck, then slowly roll down vertebrae by vertebrae, holding the end position for a more intense stretch on the hamstrings. Come back up the same way, slowly rolling up. Again, start with no weight or very light weight and work your way up.

3. Bridge push throughs (bottom half of video): From a bridge position, drop down to tap your head to the floor, then push the arms straight and head forward through the arms for a great shoulder opener. If you are unable to do a bridge position, use an exercise ball and simply hold a backbend instead.

Sharing is caring! Email this to someonePin on PinterestTweet about this on TwitterShare on Facebook
10420011_10152998294325502_6685205574616280610_n

Return to KB Sport Series #1: Doug Campbell

My swollen ankle after the sprain.

Five weeks out from the 2014 OKC NorCal Open Kettlebell Sport competition, I severely rolled my ankle on the job. The first action I took was call an advice nurse and schedule an X-ray after the swelling went down. The X-ray revealed a severe sprain in the ligaments that run over the top of the foot. Instructions were to ice, rest, and elevate for a day then wrap the foot up. Continue reading

Sharing is caring! Email this to someonePin on PinterestTweet about this on TwitterShare on Facebook
Carbs

Typical eats for KB Fit Britt

I’ve had a few requests from readers about what I eat. This post is not meant to show a “perfect” diet, and it definitely does not show everything I eat in a day. Remember that everyone is different and nourishes their body in their own way.

A couple of notes about my nutritional habits:

  • I don’t subscribe to any particular diet (nope, I don’t eat paleo, whatever that means).
  • Although I avoid processed food like the plague, give me ALL the (healthy) carbs!
  • I don’t eat a lot of meat, mainly because most of it comes from factory farms which grosses me out. However, I eat meat when I feel like it/know the meat has come from a good source. I don’t call myself a vegetarian.
  • Quick and easy meals are my go-to. I eat fried eggs for dinner more times per week than I like to admit.

Here are a few examples of different options for breakfast, lunch, and dinner.  Continue reading

Sharing is caring! Email this to someonePin on PinterestTweet about this on TwitterShare on Facebook